PD Opportunity: Enhance Learning Through Coaching: May 2 & 3

This year, as part of Celebrate Learning Week, we are hosting two sessions on how coaching can help you achieve your goals and desired change as part of your professional development and learning, with Enhance Learning Through Coaching.

In these 1.5-hour sessions, participants will learn what coaching is and how coaching can support learning, identify potential areas for development, observe a coaching conversation, and how to access free coaching through Coaching@UBC.

Course Information

Date: May 2 or May 3, 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Location: TEF III, Room 610
Cost: Free
Register online

Contact pd.workshops@ubc.ca with questions.

PD Opportunity: Thriving in Change: May 16

We have an upcoming half-day workshop on May 16: Thriving in Change.

In this workshop, participants will start by exploring their own attitudes and reactions to change, learn foundational models to broaden their appreciation of the change journey, and gain new tools and strategies for use in an interpersonal and organizational context.

Course Information

Date: May 16, 2018, 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: TEF III, Room 610
Cost: $200
Register online.

You may be able to use your professional development funding towards this course. Please visit the PD funding page for your employee group to learn more. Contact pd.workshops@ubc.ca with questions.

Maternity/Parental/Adoptive Leave EI Benefit Changes – Information for Administrators

In the February issue of Benefits FYI, we highlighted the federal government changes to EI benefits for maternity, parental and adoptive leaves that came into effect on Dec. 3, 2017. We also detailed how these benefits work with UBC’s SEB top-up and provided four scenarios to help illustrate the information.

Summary of Key Points

  1. In addition to the two parental EI benefits options (standard and extended), note that employees may be off for a longer period of time if they select the extended parental EI benefits.
  2. Any additional leave taken beyond what is stipulated in the BC Employment Standards Act will be considered general unpaid leave and the employee is responsible for the full cost of the benefits and pension they wish to continue.
  3. There are no changes to how top-up is calculated for maternity leave for birth mothers.
  4. With the exception of BCGEU Okanagan, birth parents with staff appointments (mothers and fathers) are not eligible for top-up during parental leave. As such, during the parental leave they will receive standard or extended parental EI benefits only.
  5. BCGEU Okanagan birth parents (mothers and fathers) are eligible for top-up during parental leave; however, the top-up calculation is under development with the introduction of the extended EI parental benefit. More information will be available soon.
  6. Birth parents with faculty appointments (mothers and fathers) are eligible for top-up during parental leave, and if the extended EI parental benefits is chosen, the top-up will be calculated based on the standard option. This includes Academic Executives and Postdoctoral Fellows (employees).

For HR Administrators

If you have staff who will be taking maternity, parental or adoptive leave, we encourage you to consider how you will fill your department’s staffing requirements during the employee’s leave. If you have any questions on how to fill leave replacement positions over the new extended parental leave periods, please contact your HR Advisor.

When using ePAF (for a staff leave) or paper form (for a faculty leave) to notify Payroll of a leave, make sure you correctly code the leave for Payroll purposes. For example, if you have an employee who fits key point #2 above, please code the additional leave beyond 52 weeks for birth mothers, and 37 weeks for birth fathers and adopting parents as general unpaid (personal) leave.

More information

Family Caregiver EI Benefits – Information for Administrators

In the February issue of Benefits FYI, we detailed the federal government’s new EI family caregiver benefits, which help families care for a critically ill/injured family member or person that considers you a family member. The new benefits were introduced on Dec. 3, 2017, and are offered in addition to EI compassionate care benefits.

Summary of Key Points

  • The EI family caregiver benefit for children and adults are offered in addition to compassionate care EI benefits. An employee may apply for family caregiver benefits to care for a critically ill/injured family member or person who considers them a family member, whereas compassionate care benefits apply if the employee is caring for a terminally ill family member or person who considers them a family member (must be significant risk of death within 26 weeks).
  • The BC Employment Standards Act currently provides eight weeks of job-protected leave for compassionate care, but does not include family caregiver leave. If an employee applies for family caregiving EI benefits, they will need to apply for a general unpaid leave and they will be responsible for paying the full cost of the benefits and pension they choose to maintain.

For HR Administrators

If you have an employee where the above scenarios or situations apply, please ensure that you correctly code the leave for Payroll purposes.

For example, if you have an employee applying for family caregiving EI benefits, please use the code Leave of Absence, Family Caregiver Leave (LOA/FAM) if you are using ePAF (for a staff leave) or paper form (for a faculty leave). A new code was created to ensure a Record of Employment would be generated and sent to Service Canada.

If the employee is applying for a compassionate care leave, please continue to use Leave of Absence, Compassionate Leave (LOA/COM) for the first eight weeks of leave and general unpaid (personal) leave for any additional leave.

If you have any questions or concerns about backfilling staff positions, please speak with your HR Associate or Advisor.

More Information